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Climate Pros Inc. Joins the North American Sustainable Refrigeration Council as a Platinum Member

Glendale Heights, IL Climate Pros has joined the North American Sustainable Refrigeration Council (NASRC), a nonprofit taking action to address the hurdles of natural refrigerants in supermarket applications. Climate Pros is a service contractor specializing in commercial refrigeration, among many other things, who has actively prepared their technicians to work with natural refrigerants. Their training center in Chicago, Climate Pros University, is being remodeled to include a CO2 rack System trainer along with a Howe CO2 Ice Flaker and some CO2 coils for supermarket refrigeration.

“Climate Pros is committed to pursuing environmentally friendly solutions with natural refrigerants to help reduce our customers carbon footprint and do our part to protect the climate for our future,” says Todd Ernest, Founder and CEO of Climate Pros. “We are excited to be joining the NASRC and look forward to working together to promote a more sustainable future.”

Natural refrigerants, including carbon dioxide, ammonia, and hydrocarbons, are considered “climate-friendly” alternatives to traditional fluorocarbon refrigerants, which have been identified as the fastest growing source of greenhouse gas emissions globally. Natural refrigerant technology also offers improved energy efficiency and often can save end-users money in the long run.

However, there are several unique challenges that are slowing the widespread adoption of natural refrigerants in the commercial sector, including availability of contractors and service technicians who are trained to service natural refrigerant-based systems and equipment. NASRC is spearheading efforts to overcome these barriers and ultimately create a more sustainable future for supermarket refrigeration. Climate Pros is sure to be an outstanding addition to their network of industry stakeholders.

“We are excited to welcome Climate Pros to our community,” says Danielle Wright, Executive Director of NASRC. “To position themselves as experts in this rapidly growing field, they need to have a seat at the table. They have made a choice to invest and will be at the forefront of this industry.”  

NASRC and Climate Pros will work together on trainings, webinars, and other resources to benefit the supermarket community. In addition to service contractors, NASRC membership is composed of systems manufacturers, component manufacturers, consultants, engineering firms, trade associations, nonprofits, refrigerant distributors, and end-users. NASRC end-user membership encompasses nearly 14,000 supermarket locations who will benefit from Climate Pros and other NASRC members who are committed to overcoming the barriers of natural refrigerants.

 

About Climate Pros Inc.

Climate Pros Inc. is a full service commercial refrigeration, HVAC and construction company. What began as a company of two employees in 2006 has grown to service over 2,500 locations across ten U.S. states and counting.  They provide services in commercial and industrial refrigeration, HVAC, and construction including: specialized installation, preventive maintenance, retrofitting, merchandising equipment, energy management, and lighting systems.

Climate Pros’ motto of “whatever it takes” has been proven time and again through their investment in natural refrigerant training for their technicians to ensure that they are prepared to service any equipment that comes their way.

 

About NASRC

The North American Sustainable Refrigeration Council is committed to advancing natural refrigerants in order to shape a more sustainable future for supermarket refrigeration. The organization focuses on natural refrigerants due to the unique set of market challenges that prevent the widespread adoption of natural refrigerants, such as codes and standards, lack of incentives programs, and availability of trained contractors and service technicians.

NASRC addresses these challenges through their progress groups, which each tackle a specific barrier. By taking action now, NASRC intends to open the door to a more sustainable future for supermarket refrigeration.

 

More information about Climate Pros is available at https://www.climateprosinc.com/.

Nearly 14,000 US Supermarket Locations are NASRC members

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The North America Sustainable Refrigeration Council (NASRC) is excited to announce that our  end-user membership now encompasses nearly 14,000 supermarkets. 

“The growth of this organization has been amazing,” says Keilly Witman, owner of KW Refrigerant Management Strategy and former head of the EPA’s GreenChill Partnership. “Supermarket end-users are excited, because the NASRC gets things done. After years of all talk and no action about the hurdles that stand in the way of natural refrigerants in this industry, we finally have an organization that flips it around - it’s all about action.”

Most of the NASRC’s efforts focus on overcoming hurdles in three areas: service contractors and technicians, cost, and codes and standards.

The main programs that address hurdles related to service contractors and technicians focus on matching end-users with trained, experienced service contractors, ensuring clear communication between end-users and contractors who are working on their first all-natural refrigerant store, and collaborating with traditional service technician training organizations to ensure that technicians have the training they need to successfully install and manage an all-natural store. 

The NASRC’s Natural Refrigerants Service Network, for instance, is an online tool that allows refrigeration service contractors to provide information about their natural refrigerant experience, along with the areas where they do business. End-users can join the online network and mine that data by geographic location and the natural refrigerant they are looking to use.

“The NASRC has just begun to make the most out of this tool; the ideas are endless,” says Bryan Beitler of Source Refrigeration. “Just the webinar the NASRC held for service technicians explaining the new requirements of the Section 608 amendments made it worthwhile to participate.”

The NASRC’s Return on Investment Progress Group is working to overcome the causes that tend to cause natural refrigerants to cost more than traditional centralized DX systems.

“There are big cost hurdles, like economies of scale, and there are smaller cost hurdles, like the lack of distributors that carry refrigerant-grade CO2,” says Mike Ellinger of Whole Foods Market. “The distributor problem sounds like its a small thing, but it costs money, and those costs build up over time, if you don’t have a solution for it.” 

In response, the NASRC has begun cooperating with HARDI, the trade association for HVACR distributors, to bring traditional distributors into the natural refrigerant supply chain. According to NASRC Executive Director, Danielle Wright, the NASRC and HARDI will work to find a distributor in any area of the country where an end user wants to open a natural refrigerant store. 

The codes and standards hurdle may be the toughest nut to crack, says Wright. “The organizations that write standards for supermarket refrigeration may not be aware of how urgent it is to get standards in place.” She cites the fact that California plans to require supermarkets to use refrigerants with a GWP less than 150 in just a few years.

“We are eager to work with ASHRAE and UL and discuss how to get these standards done, but they have few people on their committees who come from the refrigeration world, much less from the natural refrigerant world.”

“Is it any wonder that supermarket end-users are flocking to this organization,” says Witman, “given its track record in under three years of going to bat for supermarkets?” 

“We don’t really have to recruit supermarket end-users,” reports Wright. “They come to us, because they’ve heard about the progress we’ve already made in all of the areas that have prevented them from moving forward with naturals in the past. No problem is too small, or too big, for us to tackle.”