Regulation

NASRC to Present Natural Refrigerant Seminar And Live CO2 Demo

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Thursday, January 10th, 1PM - 4:30PM (networking reception to follow)
Danfoss Headquarters, Baltimore, MD


On January 10th, the NASRC will present a free seminar, which will provide an overview of natural refrigerant applications in supermarkets, and why they are considered a "future-proof" alternative to HFC refrigerants. Gain insight into refrigerant regulations and how they will impact the supermarket industry. Learn about the latest natural refrigerant technology trends, barriers, and solutions to accelerate adoption.

This informative session will feature a special focus on CO2 technologies, an update on CO2 standard development, and live demonstration of a CO2 transcritical system. 

Agenda

  • Natural refrigerant options for supermarkets, advantages, challenges, and case studies

  • Incentives for low-GWP refrigerants 

  • Refrigerant regulations at international, federal, and state level 

  • Update on the IIAR CO2 standard for commercial refrigeration 

  • Technology advances & automated controls 

  • Live demonstration of CO2 transcritical system  

Attendees will include food retail end-users, service contractors, educators, utilities, policy makers, NGOs, and environmental stakeholders.

networking reception sponsored by CoolSys and Danfoss will follow the seminar.

This event is generously hosted by Danfoss. 
Space is limited and registration is required.


Thank you to our sponsors!

Seminar Highlights Challenges and Successes of Natural Refrigerants

NASRC held a natural refrigerants seminar focused on both the barriers and case studies of successful projects. Over thirty representatives from the supermarket refrigeration industry attended, including retailers, such as Albertsons and Whole Foods, as well as contractors, consultants, utilities and local state agencies.

Why Supermarkets Should Care about the Kigali Amendment

In 2016, the Kigali Amendment updated the Montreal Protocol to gain global commitment to the phasedown of HFCs. Developed countries, like the United States, will be required to begin reducing HFC production and import of HFCs in 2019. This reduction is expected to correlate to increased HFC prices, especially those with high GWP.